CD8

Clone TC8 validated for studying tumor infiltrating CD8 positive T cells in FFPE tissues
Fig.1: Dense infiltrate of CD8 positive lymphoyctes in adenocarcinoma of the prostate.
Fig.2: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate infiltrated by CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.3: Adenocarcinoma of the lung with marked infiltration by CD8 positive lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are predominantly located between cancer cells with immediate contact to neoplastic cells.
Fig.4: Adenocarcinoma of the lung with marked infiltration by CD8 positive lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are almost exclusivel located in the tumor stroma and do not have immediate contact to neoplastic cells.
Fig.5: Dense infiltrate of CD8 positive lymphocytes in an adenocarcinoma of the esophageus.
Fig.6: Very high density of CD8 positive lymphocytes in an adenocarcinoma of the esophageus.
Fig.7: CD8 positive lymphocytes are predominantly located in the tumor stroma in this adenocarcinoma of the esophageus.
Fig.8: Intestinal type gastric cancer with a moderately dense infiltration of CD8 positive cells.
Fig.9: Intestinal type gastric cancer containing relatively few CD8 positive cells.
Fig.10: Only few CD8 positive lymphocytes in a mucinous ovarian tumor.
Fig.11: CD8 positive lymphocytes in an endometroid ovarian cancer.
Fig.12: Dense infiltrate of CD8 positive lymphocytes in an serous carcinoma of the ovary.
Fig.13: Scattered CD8 positive lymphocytes in a squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva are predominantly located at the stroma-epithelium interface.
Fig.14: CD8 positive lymphocytes in a squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri. In this case, lymphocytes are predominantly located in the cancer stroma.
Fig.15: CD8 positive lymphocytes in a squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri. In this case, lymphocytes are located both in the cancer stroma in within cancer cell nests.
Fig.16: Squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri with very dense lymphocytic infiltration.
Fig.17: Vaginal squamous cell carcinoma with only few CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.18: Vaginal squamous cell carcinoma with very dense infiltration of CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.19: Papillary kidny cancer with few CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.20: Clear cell kidney cancer with moderately dense infiltration of CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.21: Clear cell kidney cancer with dense infiltration of CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.22: Clear cell kidney cancer with only few scattered CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.23: Clear cell kidney cancer with high number of CD8 positive lymphocytes. CD8 positive cells are regularly arranged at the periphery of tumor cell sheets.
Fig.24: Some scattered CD8 positive lymphocytes in a papillary non-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.
Fig.25: Dense infiltrate of CD8 positive lymphocytes in a muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.
Fig.26: CD8 positive lymphocytes in liver cell cancer (moderate density).
Fig.27: CD8 positive lymphocytes in a low grade tubular adenoma of the colon.
Fig.28: CD8 positive lymphocytes in a high grade tubular adenoma of the colon.
Fig.29: Anal squamous cell carcinoma with scattered CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.30: Anal squamous cell carcinoma with scattered CD8 positive lymphocytes.
Fig.31: Few scattered CD8 positive lymphocytes in a gastrointestinal stroma tumor.
Fig.32: CD8 positive lymphocytes in this neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas are primarily located in the tumor stroma.
Fig.33: CD8 positive lymphocytes in a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.
Fig.34: Dense infiltration of CD8 positive lymphocytes in a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.
Fig.35: Dense infiltrate of CD8 positive lymphocytes in a thymoma.
Fig.36: CD8 positive lymphocytes in a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

Clone TC8 has been developed specifically for the immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of CD8 in routine FFPE human tissue specimen. Clone TG8 has been optimized for optimal signal to noise contrast and validated for the identification of CD8+ tumor infiltrating T cells (TILs) with the aim to allow an unequaled specific detection of CD8 in the tumor microenvironment.

CD8+ T cells play a central role for the killing of cancer cells. They have the ability to infiltrate different human tumors and are engaged in the development of a specific tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells have developed mechanisms to successfully evade the antitumor immune response by generating inhibitory signals through upregulation of the expression of immunosuppressive components. Effective blockade of this interaction is considered as a major factor in the development of cancer immunotherapies. Moreover, preexisting CD8+ T cells seem to predict the efficacy of such immune checkpoint therapies.

The T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizes specific antigenic peptides on the surface of cancer and other target cells presented by HLA-I/β2m complexes. Binding to TCR induces a signaling transduction cascade, leading to execution of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) functions. While CD8+ T cells are directly involved in antitumor cytotoxic responses, the involvement of CD4+ T cells is more indirect, e.g. by their help in priming of CD8+ T cells.

In contrast, inhibitory T-cell receptors such as PD-1, CTLA-4 and TIGIT are activated by the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment with the aim to inactivate tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). The most effective current cancer immunotherapies include immune checkpoint inhibition ICI and block T-cell inhibitory receptors. Moreover, effective blockade immunotherapy appears to be associated with the presence of CD8+ T cells.

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